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From NASA to the president, many have worn A-B’s patches

Transcript


[BELL RINGING]

[MUSIC PLAYING]

The Boy Scouts. The Girl Scouts. The White House. NASA. The military. They all have a common thread.

We’re making Apollo 15.

A patch representing the Apollo space mission.

Apollo 15 went up in the ’70s. And the reason we’re still making them is, collectors love them.

Space patches.

We’ve had the contract with NASA since 1971.

Postal patches.

US Postal. Your carrier, your delivery guy. Patches are made right here in Weaverville for their uniforms.

A-B Emblem in Weaverville, near Asheville.

And we do a lot of patches for the Girl Scouts.

And for the Boy Scouts.

Well, we’ll make them for a soccer club or a local swim team.

And the US military.

We probably made those patches that are on their uniforms.

The patch on his green jacket.

You know, we do make the Master’s patch.

Who thinks about patches? But it’s actually a very exciting business.

Henry Conrad thought about patches. And when he stepped off the boat in 1929, he might have also thought, how am I going to make it in America after living my life in Germany?

20 years old when he arrived. He had $4.68 in his pocket.

God bless America. The company sort of begins with $4.68. And now you have emblems going up into space.

Yeah. Yeah, yeah. Exactly.

We have SRB ignition, and we have liftoff.

[SEWING MACHINES RUNNING]

Last year we made 70 million patches.

70 million.

Every emblem has to be cut out one at a time by hand.

70 million?

Yeah. They’re all cut out one at a time. When you’re in the patch business, you never know where you’re going to see your work.

You might see it on the arm of the president of the United States.

Yeah, it doesn’t get any cooler now

although astronaut autographs are pretty cool too. Alan Shepard, John Glenn. And golfer Bubba Watson wearing that green jacket.

I’ve invited him to come and play at the Grove Park Inn, but I’m not sure he’s going to make it.

I think it’s a great story.

A success story.

He was proud of his heritage, but he was more proud to be an American.

[SEWING MACHINES RUNNING]

You’ve got a colorful place to work as well.

Yes, we do, yeah.

[MUSIC PLAYING]

[BELL RINGING]

[MUSIC PLAYING]

The Boy Scouts. The Girl Scouts. The White House. NASA. The military. They all have a common thread.

[SEWING MACHINES RUNNING]

We’re making Apollo 15.

A patch representing the Apollo space mission.

Apollo 15 went up in the ’70s. And the reason we’re still making them is, collectors love them.

Space patches.

We’ve had the contract with NASA since 1971.

Postal patches.

US Postal. Your carrier, your delivery guy. Patches are made right here in Weaverville for their uniforms.

A-B Emblem in Weaverville, near Asheville.

And we do a lot of patches for the Girl Scouts.

And for the Boy Scouts.

Well, we’ll make them for a soccer club or a local swim team.

And the US military.

We probably made those patches that are on their uniforms.

The patch on his green jacket.

You know, we do make the Master’s patch.

Who thinks about patches? But it’s actually a very exciting business.

Henry Conrad thought about patches. And when he stepped off the boat in 1929, he might have also thought, how am I going to make it in America after living my life in Germany?

20 years old when he arrived. And he had $4.68 in his pocket.

God bless America. The company sort of begins with $4.68 and now you have emblems going up into space.

Yeah. Yeah, yeah. Exactly.

We have SRB ignition, and we have liftoff.

[SEWING MACHINES RUNNING]

Last year we made 70 million patches.

70 million.

Every emblem has to be cut out one at a time by hand.

70 million?

Yeah. They’re all cut out one at a time. When you’re in the patch business, you never know where you’re going to see your work.

You might see it on the arm of the president of the United States.

Yeah. It doesn’t get any cooler than that.

Although astronaut autographs are pretty cool too. Alan Shepard, John Glenn. And golfer Bubba Watson wearing that green jacket.

I’ve invited him to come and play at the Grove Park Inn, but I’m not sure he’s going to make it.

[SEWING MACHINES RUNNING]

I think it’s a great story.

A success story.

He was proud of his heritage, but he was more proud to be an American.

[SEWING MACHINES RUNNING]

You’ve got a colorful place to work as well.

Yes, we do, yeah.

[MUSIC PLAYING]